Winning Tips for Online Poker Tournaments

Almost every poker lover dreams to play in online poker tournament for many reasons. Most of the players who participate in any poker tournament want to win big money, name and fame. However, many of them just want to improve their existing poker skills and get prepared for next big poker competitions or tournaments. After all, these tournaments increase their poker playing experience. However, the best tip to win at any poker tournament is to learn the tricks and best moves for any poker game set. This article contains some useful tips and strategies that are quite helpful to win at online poker tournaments:

1. Position is quite important if you are playing no limit texas hold’em poker game. You should play tight early in the position or use aggressive poker playing style from the late position. You must also try to steal blinds as well.

2. You must accumulate the maximum number of poker chips at a specific time frame. Meaning that you must win additional chips than what usually want to win at ring games. You must also increase the blinds as you play while increasing your chips.

3. Whenever you call a bet, you must positively have a robust hand.

4. You must always concentrate on the game. If you have a multi-table arrangement than keep an eye on your own table and try to collect as many chips as you can.

5. Always be flexible and watchful. Whether you are playing online or offline, you must know when you should take on a specific attitude. You must learn when to play tight and when to play aggressive. Also, you must develop the ability to read your opponents move, position and tournament structure.

6. Read offline and online poker tournaments moves made by your opponents. The more you read, the more your poker skills will improve. When you have learnt some lessons, try them out adopt the one that works best in different game situations.

Understanding The Logistics of Poker Tournaments

Tournaments are poker competitions where all of the players play at the same time and continue to play until only one player is left. Tournaments are fun to play in, have a low entry fees and offer a large prize pool to be won. For these reasons they are a very popular. They are inexpensive way for novice poker players to learn how to play the game, as well as a providing a place for more experienced players gain experience.

While there are many different types of poker games played at casinos and online rooms, tournament play is usually reserved for Texas Hold’em, Omaha, and 7-card Stud, because these games have a large following.

Poker tournaments can have as few as 6 players (single table tournaments) to thousands of players for larger events. Large tournaments consist of many tables, each table having 8 to 10 players. The tables are slowly removed from the tourney as players are eliminated, and players are balanced from table to table as needed. (These are known as multi-table tournaments). Finally all but the last table will be removed and these last 8 to 10 players play until only one of them remains.

Tournament Basics

To play in a tournament players have to pay two fees. They have to pay an entry fee to the poker room hosting the tournament to cover the expenses involved. This gives the player an assigned seat and a set quantity of tournament chips with which to play (these chips have no cash value). Players also pay a buy-in fee. The buy-in fee is held and paid out as prizes. The prize payout differs from tournament to tournament but typically it all goes to the few players fortunate enough to make the final table.

The object of a tournament is to win all of the chips. All tournament players start out with the same quantity of chips to play with and all start playing at the same time. Players play until they lose all of their chips and are then removed from the tournament. A tournament continues non-stop, often for several hours, until only one person remains. As playing progresses the stakes rise (Blinds are doubled on a timed interval), making it more and more difficult for players with short stacks to remain in the game.

Players are awarded prize money based on their finishing position in the tournament. The top finishers earn the most money with the 1st place winner usually receiving about 30% of the total prize money, the 2nd place winner about 20% and so on. The number of winners and the size of the payouts depend upon the rules for the tournament being played and the number of people playing.

Re-buys and Add-ons

Some poker tournaments allow players a re-buy option. This re-buy option allows players to purchase more chips if they run out of them at the start of the tournament. A player can purchase the same number of chips that he/she started the tournament with. Some poker tournaments allow unlimited re-buys during the first hour of play, while other tournaments allow only a single re-buy.

An add-on option is similar to the re-buy option. Add-ons differ in that they are usually only offered once at the end of the re-buy period and can be purchased regardless of how many chips you have. As the name implies these chips are added on to your stack of chips.

All proceeds from re-buys and add-ons are added to the prize pool less house fees (if applicable).

Betting

Tournament betting is structured with the betting limit increasing regularly. The changes in betting limits occur differently depending on the tournament; some are timed while some increase the limit after a set number of rounds are played.

Balancing and Collapsing Tables

Larger tournaments start out with more than one table, each having 8 to 10 players. As the tournament progresses players will be eliminated and the number of players at each table will not remain the same. For the tournament to be fair the number of players at each table should be the same, so the organizers move players from table to table in an attempt to keep all the tables equally populated.

Balancing is the practice of moving players from full tables to less full tables when the difference is 3 or more players.

Collapsing tables is the practice of removing tables once there are enough empty spaces among the rest of the tables to do so. Thus with 10 player tables when there are 10 empty spaces the players from one table are moved to empty spaces and that table is taken out of play.

Early Chip Leaders in Poker Tournaments

Since the only way to win a poker tournament is to finish with the most chips, having the biggest chip stack is always a good thing – even early in the tournament. In fact, getting an early edge on your opponents offers many advantages. Alternately, having a small stack and being at the mercy of early leaders can be a nightmare. Here’s what you need to know about the importance of early chip leaders in poker tournaments.

When You’re One of Them

Being the chip leader puts you that much closer to ultimately winning the tournament, even if you’re several rounds away from the final table. It’s important to take your status seriously, though. Instead of getting comfortable and playing tight in an effort to keep your stack intact – or alternately playing too loose because you feel like you can absorb the losses – use your chips wisely by taking smart risks and by using your superior stack to bully your less well endowed opponents.

When You’re Not

If you’re not leading, it can be discouraging, especially if you’ve made a mistake and find yourself short stacked early in the tournament. Many players make the mistake of going after the chip leader with an aggressive bluff in an effort to double up, but that’s a good way to bust out of a tournament early if they call or reraise with a good hand. Your best move is to stick to your original strategy, but be wary of getting trapped or bullied by a chip leader.

Pros and Cons of Being the Chip Leader

Having the most chips in a tournament has obvious advantages. Many of your opponents will not be able to call bets that represent only a fraction of your stack. That makes bluffing and semi-bluffing much easier and puts you in control of the action regardless of your position in any hand. As an early chip leader, you should definitely be taking advantage not only of your extra chips but of the small blinds by seeing more flops.

Being a chip leader early in a tournament can give some players a false sense of comfort. They get too comfortable and start taking bets with more risk than gain. Others break their advantage down slowly but consistently by calling on bets they shouldn’t, simply because they can. It’s also important to remember that while you’re now a larger and more difficult target, you’re a target nonetheless, and many players will challenge you simply because you’re the chip leader.

Why it Matters in Different Tournaments

Being a chip leader offers the largest advantage in a sit and go, where an early lead will often see you through to the end. In a bounty tournament or rebuy, where players tend to be looser and more aggressive in the early rounds, having the biggest stack can actually make you an obvious target for maniac players with something to prove. In a regular MTT, being an early chip leader gives you some important advantages, but you need to manage your stack wisely to get the full benefits of your good fortune.